Are you drinking water at the right time?

Water is as an essential nutrient because it is required in amounts that exceed the body’s ability to produce it. Water makes up 50-80% of our body weight, depending on lean body mass, therefore, it’s an essential nutrients. Water helps maintains the balance of body fluids, including digestion, absorption, circulation, creation of saliva, transportation of nutrients, and maintenance of body temperature. The exact amount of water to drink actually depends on your weight and your activity level. For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, that would be 75 to 150 ounces (2-5 Lits) of water a day. On average, men have a higher lean body mass than women and higher percentage of body mass as water than in women. The relative mass of water decreases in both men and women with age. Human requirements for water are related to metabolic needs and are highly variable. They depend to some extent on individual metabolism. Solid foods contribute approximately 20% of total water intake or about 700-800 mL. The remainder of the dietary intake comes from free water and/or other fluid. An additional 250 mL or so of water is also made available to the body from metabolism (water of oxidation). The body must retain a minimal amount to maintain a tolerable solute load for the kidneys. Excluding perspiration, the normal turnover of water is approximately 4% of total body weight in adults. In a 70 kg adult, this is equivalent to 2,500-3,000 mL/day.

Naturally, Water losses from lungs and skin (insensible losses) are responsible for 50% of the total water turnover. They are sensitive to environmental conditions and can be increased at high temperatures, high altitude and low humidity. During summer, when heat stress may be high, water depletion can lead to heat exhaustion, loss of consciousness and heat stroke. Oral health may also be affected by fluid consumption. The body must retain a minimal amount to maintain a tolerable solute load for the kidneys. Excluding perspiration, the normal turnover of water is approximately 4% of total body weight in adults. In a 70 kg adult, this is equivalent to 2,500-3,000 mL/day. Water losses from lungs and skin (insensible losses) are responsible for 50% of the total water turnover. They are sensitive to environmental conditions and can be increased at high temperatures, high altitude and low humidity.

During summer, when heat stress may be high, water depletion can lead to heat exhaustion, loss of consciousness and heat stroke. Unfit, overweight, older people may be especially at risk, particularly if they are subjected to strenuous exercise. Type Infants and dependent children may also be at risk if not offered sufficient fluids. The remainder of the losses are from urine and stools. Dehydration of as little as 2% loss of body weight results in impaired physiological responses and performance.

Several factors increase the possibility of chronic, mild dehydration, including a poor thirst mechanism dissatisfaction with the taste of water consumption of common diuretics such as caffeine and alcohol, participation in exercise and environmental conditions. Kidney function can decline as part of the normal ageing process with decrease in kidney mass, declines in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. This decline in kidney function together with hormonal changes and factors such as decreased thirst perception, medication, cognitive changes, limited mobility and increased use of diuretics and laxatives make older adults a group of particular concern.

Why is water important?

1.Water carries other nutrients and oxygen to cells.

2.It also transports waste out from cells.

3.Water keeps our body temperature regulated and feeds our muscles and skin.

What Time to drink water?

•* When the stomach is empty

•* During or after a meal dilutes the body’s natural juices that aid in digestion.

•* One (1) glass 30 min before and during a meal to help digestion.

•* Drink water an hour after a meal to allow the body to absorb the nutrients.

•* Remember, don’t drink too soon before or after the meal as the water will dilute the digestive juices

What happen if drink too much of water?

When you drink too much of water, the salt concentration in your blood reduces, causes the cells in the organs throughout in the body to swell. Drinking a lot of water (more than 4-6 liters) over a short time can upset the body’s sodium balance, and cause a potentially fatal condition (hyponatremia or water intoxication). Eight 8-ounce glasses, which equals about 2 liters, or half a gallon is recommend. This is called the 8×8 rule and is very easy to remember

Signs:

1.Throbbing Headaches throughout the day

2.Nausea

3.Vomiting

4.Diarrhea

Can I gain weight if I drink too much water? NO

Drinking much water helps in reducing weight by reducing the amount of food consumed. If water taken exceeds this capacity, the body can no longer flush out the extra water and it will cause weight gain.

How much water is too much an hour?

Human kidneys can eliminate about 5.3-7.4 gallons (20-28 liters) of water a day, but they can’t get rid of more that 27-33 ounces (0.8-1.0 liters) per hour. Therefore, in order to avoid hyponatremia symptoms, you should not drink more that 27-33 ounces (0.8-1.0 liters) of water per hour, no average. A non-active person should drink a half ounce: 4oz) (1/2 cup) of water for every pound of body weight.

Why should we not drink water while standing?

Since the water goes directly through, the require nutrients and vitamins don’t reach the liver and digestive tract. This is bcos when you stand and drink water, it travels through the system really fast and you risk your lungs and heart functions. The oxygen levels also get disturbed this way. Drink water while sitting to allow your muscle and nervous system is much more relaxed and helps the nerves to digest food and other fluids easily. Your kidneys also pace the filtration process while sitting.

Why do I poop every time I drink water?

Since constipation is related to dehydration in the colon, you need to make sure you are drinking lots of water. When your body is properly hydrated, less water will be withdrawn from the colon. This will keep your stool soft and easy to pass.

Is clear pee good?

If your pee is crystal clear, you’re probably drinking too much water, which can throw off your electrolyte balance in potentially harmful ways. But if your urine is clear and you’re peeing 20 times a day, you’re drinking water excessively.

Is drinking water at night good?

Drinking water before bed has a number pf benefits, but drinking too close to bedtime can interrupt your sleep cycle and negatively impact heart health. you must drink enough water throughout the day to avoid dehydration and prevent excess water intake at night.

Important Health Tips

What happen if you drink Urine?

When urine passes through the urinary tract, it becomes contaminated with bacteria. Drinking urine, whether yours or someone else’s, contaminates your system with bacteria that causes gastrointestinal problems or other infections.

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